Category Archives: Brand Managment

Porsche is not a high-performance VW

There was an interview in Sunday’s New York Times with Worfgang Porsche, the elder statesman of Porsche, about their acquiring Volkswagen.

Porsche acquisition of Volkswagen imminent

One statement, the last in the article, was a quote from Mr. Porsche stating: “When we looked at the numbers, it made sense.” How often have botched and misadvised mergers and acquisitions begun life with those very same words?

The real question to answer has nothing to do with the numbers. Continue reading Porsche is not a high-performance VW

A greener world needs environment-friendly packaging for brands

If you’re company has made a commitment to becoming environmentally friendly, let your customers know it.

And the first place most consumers see that commitment is in your brand’s package. Two things: is it re-cyclible and is it made from re-cycled materials? Continue reading A greener world needs environment-friendly packaging for brands

Is there a difference between corporate identity and corporate brand?

This question is addressed in a new book, Soul of the Corporation: How to Manage the Identity of Your Company. It was written by two academics, John Kimberly of University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and Hamid Bouchikhi, a professor at International Business School in Eurpoe (ESSEC).

An interview with author John Kimberly is available at Knowledge@Wharton. But if you don’t have time to go there, here’s my interpretation of his answer to the question: is there a difference between company identity and corporate brand. Continue reading Is there a difference between corporate identity and corporate brand?

No one sells you branding.

I got a phone call today from a guy wanting to sell me “audio impressions” on web blogs. Only that’s not what he said.

He was told by the medium’s management that five-second audio pronouncements of a slogan was “branding”. He wanted to help me brand my business by selling me ad impressions. Continue reading No one sells you branding.